Electro- and Magnetoneurography

More than 6 % of the population suffers from peripheral neuropathies. Over 90 % of all neuropathies are induced by local pressure on the nerve. A detailed diagnosis requires exact localization and treatment by conservative or surgical decompression e.g. 300 000 surgeries are only performed for the carpal tunnel syndrome every year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magnetoneurography (MNG) provides an alternative and also very attractive technology to the electrode-based nerve conduction studies called Electroneurography (ENG). The Electroneuography is the current gold standard of nerve assessment to investigate the nerve conduction velocity. In this case the nerve signal is deviated by conventional electrical electrodes. This technique only allows to distinguish between axonal and demyelinating forms of neuropathy, but the localizing capacities are quite poor. Finally, this results in a lack of spatial resolution, because only segment-wise information are available. Additional modern nerve imaging techniques are required to create a functional projection of the nerve characterizing for an accurate diagnosis and treatment. Hence, our first objective is to optimize the diagnostic specificity via a multichannel neurographical approach and to apply new signal processing methods for further signal enhancement.

Magnetoneurography uses magnetic field sensors instead and they do not require direct skin contact. Moreover magnetic field sensors can be combined in arrays to make a localization of the potential nerve pathology possible. This enables also highly resolved functional nerve sampling at bedside. The main objective of this modern technique is to optimize the diagnostic specificity of neuropathies by developing a spatially continuous scanning of nerves with a magnetic field sensor. This approach will increase and also combine the spatial resolution and functional information. In summary, this will further improve the treatment.

The nerve electromagnetic field of human nerve pulses is quite low. Peak amplitudes in the range of ft to pT can be achieved by using an external electric stimulation of the nerve. As the stimulus to the nerve can be repeated, the signal to noise ratio can be improved by using enhanced low-noise adaptive averaging algorithms. Project B6 of the Collaborative Research Centre CRC 1261 focuses on the Electro- and Magnetoneurography and also the signal to noise enhancement of such nerve signals. This project founded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft uses new sensor concepts to realize a Magnetoneurography at room temperature. Further details about this project of the CRC 1261 can be found here.

Website News

30.11.2018: New student project on driver distraction added.

01.10.2018: Dissertation of Philipp Bullding added.

14.08.2018: New section about our SONAR "sisters" added.

18.07.2018: New section about our Parkinson voice training game added.

07.07.2018: New lecture Fundamentals of Acoustics by Jan Abshagen added.

Recent Publications

E. Elzenheimer, H. Laufs, T. Sander-Thömmes, G. Schmidt: Magnetoneurograhy of an Electrically Stimulated Arm Nerve, Joint Journal of the German Society for Biomedical Engineering in VDE and the Austrian and Swiss Societies for Biomedical Engineering and the German Society of Biomaterials, Volume 63, Number 12, Pages 363-366, September 2018

Contact

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Schmidt

E-Mail: gus@tf.uni-kiel.de

Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
Faculty of Engineering
Institute for Electrical Engineering and Information Engineering
Digital Signal Processing and System Theory

Kaiserstr. 2
24143 Kiel, Germany

Recent News

Saturday Morning Physics 2018

The DSS team was invited to participate in the last of the "Saturday Morning Physics" (SMP) events in 2018. On December 8th, a Saturday of course, Thorben Kaak, Gerhard Schmidt, and Owe Wisch gave a talk on underwater signal processing. Pupils from all around Schleswig-Holstein were quite interested, especially in the basics of SONAR systems.