Latest Talks

Dr. Tilmann Sander-Thömmes, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany


  • Date: 23.04.2018
  • Time: 17:15 h
  • Place: Aquarium, Building D, Faculty of Engineering, Kaiserstr. 2., 24143 Kiel


German title

Biomagnetische Sensor- und Auswertesysteme - Fortschritt durch einen modularen Ansatz



In the field of biomagnetism the application of mathematical algorithms has been as important as the hardware itself. Traditionally, the hardware (the sensor Array) was based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and operated for decades without large modifications. In contrast to that the range of relevant mathematical algorithms increased at a steady pace. This was driven by factors such as an ever increasing PC based computing power, new physiological insights motivating the application of existing algorithms, and the development of new algorithms to test biophysical models among others.

After around three decades of SQUID based Hardware, now new magnetic field sensors with the potential to replace or complement SQUIDs are available or under development. The opportunity for new sensors is the consequence of clinical challenges unsolved by state-of-the art SQUID based systems and due to new technology allowing alternative quantum physics based sensors in a small sized housing. These new sensors often have extra capabilities compared with SQUIDs and naturally some disadvantages. I will illustrate the modular approach using the example of optically pumped magnetometers and the signal processing toolbox FieldTrip.


Short biography

Tilmann Sander-Thömmes studied Physics at University of Freiburg and ETH Zürich and graduated there in 1992. He continued to obtain a PhD in solid-state physics at Imperial College in London. Following two post-docs in Berlin he has been working at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt since 2000 in the laboratory for Biosignals. Since 1998 he is involved with measuring and analysing magnetic brain signals. He is an expert in magnetoencephalography using both SQUIDs and more recently optically pumped magnetometers.

Dr. Jan Abshagen, Wehrtechnische Dienststelle der Bundeswehr für Schiffe und Marinewaffen, Maritime Technologie und Forschung (WTD 71), Kiel Germany


  • Date: 16.04.2018
  • Time: 17:15 h
  • Place: Aquarium, Building D, Faculty of Engineering, Kaiserstr. 2., 24143 Kiel



Coming soon.


Short biography

Cming soon.

Dr.-Ing. Vasudev Kandade Rajan, Becker Automotive Systems GmbH, Straubing, Germany


  • Date: 27.11.2017
  • Time: 17:15 h
  • Place: Aquarium, Building D, Faculty of Engineering, Kaiserstr. 2., 24143 Kiel



The application of active noise cancellation in real-world has not been fully realized yet. From reducing environment noise through the usage of headphones, to engine noise on commercial jets there are a number of use cases. Each of these use case brings its own set of challenges which can be understood only through multi-disciplinary work. One such use case the the reduction of road noise in vehicles. Structure-borne road noise dominates the cabin of modern vehicles. Several road noise cancellation (RNC) prototype systems have been implemented and demonstrated. These systems are based mainly on analog sensors. The placement of these sensors has been so far been based on random optimization methods. In this talk I will talk about the challenges in developing a generic digital RNC system which includes problem analysis, sensor placement, and performance. An adaptive algorithm process the acceleration signals with high convergence and reaction time for various speed and surface ranges, in order to maintain high audible effects for the passengers. Several modern vehicle platforms are integrated with the digital RNC system with ANC microphone at the headliners and the standard audio loudspeaker setup in order to integrate the technology with the existing audio layout of the vehicle.


Short biography

Vasudev Kandade Rajan received Bachelors degree in Electronics and Communication from Visvesvaraya Technological University, Bangalore, India. He joined as Project Research Assistant in July 2008 in the Electrical Communication Engineering Dept, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. There he worked on performance management of IEEE 802.11 WLANs until Sept 2009. He then went to obtain his Masters degree (MSc.) in Digital Communications, 2011 and PhD degree in Signal Processing, 2017 from Universtiy of Kiel, Germany. Currently he is working in the R&D department of Harman Becker Automotive Systems GmbH, Straubing, Germany.

Jonas Sautter, Nuance Communications, Ulm, Germany


  • Date: 20.11.2017
  • Time: 17:15 h
  • Place: Aquarium, Building D, Faculty of Engineering, Kaiserstr. 2., 24143 Kiel



In mobile communication, the bandwidth of transferred speech signals is either narrow-band (300Hz – 3.4kHz) or wide-band (50Hz – 7kHz or higher). As the limitation to 3.4kHz degrades the speech quality and intelligibility, it is of great interest to artificially extend narrow-band speech signals to wide-band speech.

This talk presents a deep neural network (DNN) approach to artificial bandwidth extension with a focus on robustness in practical applications.

It is based on the source-filter model which decomposes the signal into two parts:

  • an excitation signal and
  • a spectral envelope.

The excitation (source part) describes the fine spectral structure which consists of white noise for unvoiced speech and an impulse train for voiced speech. The spectral envelope (filter part) describes the coarse spectral structure, i.e. the formants or resonance frequencies that make up different phonemes.

While the extension of the excitation signal can be done with simple mathematical methods that do not introduce strong artifacts, the envelope is much more relevant for the quality of the reconstructed wide-band signal. That is why the wide-band envelope is estimated with DNNs in this approach, which are trained on a large speech corpus.


Short biography

Jonas Sautter studied Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Computer Engineering at RWTH Aachen University, Germany. He received his Master of Science degree in 2016. The Master’s thesis with the title “Digital Robust Control for Active Noise Cancellation in Headphones and Hearing Aids” was composed at the Institute of Communication Systems at RWTH Aachen. Since November 2016, he is a PhD student at Nuance Communications in Ulm, supervised by Professor Gerhard Schmidt, Head of the Digital Signal Processing and System Theory group at Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel.

Website News

03.03.2018: Team wall added.

28.02.2018: News wall added.

20.01.2017: Talk from Dr. Sander-Thömmes added.

12.01.2018: New RED section on Trend Removal added.

29.12.2017: Section Years in Review added.

Recent Publications

T. O. Wisch, T. Kaak, A. Namenas, G. Schmidt: Spracherkennung in stark gestörten Unterwasserumgebungen, Proc. DAGA 2018

S. Graf, T. Herbig, M. Buck, G. Schmidt: Low-Complexity Pitch Estimation Based on Phase Differences Between Low-Resolution Spectra, Proc. Interspeech, pp. 2316 -2320, 2017


Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Schmidt


Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
Faculty of Engineering
Institute for Electrical Engineering and Information Engineering
Digital Signal Processing and System Theory

Kaiserstr. 2
24143 Kiel, Germany

Recent News

New PhDs in the DSS Team

Since January this year we have two new PhD students in the team: Elke Warmerdam and Finn Spitz.

Elke is from Amsterdam and she works in the neurology department in the university hospital in the group of Prof. Maetzler. Her research topic is movement analysis of patients with neurologic disorders. Elke cooperates with us in signal processing related aspects of her research. Elke plays ...

Read more ...